Posts Tagged ‘Parade’

Unidos da Tijuca Wins Rio de Janeiro Carnival

February 19, 2010

Samba school Unidos da Tijuca is the Champion of the Special Group Parade in Rio de Janeiro Carnival 2010. The school, one of the oldest in Brazil, won their last title in 1936. Their parade was themed “It’s a Secret” and also granted talented carnavalesco (Carnival director) Paulo Barros his first title. Barros had already made his mark in Rio de Janeiro Carnival with ideas such as the DNA float in the same Unidos da Tijuca in 2004. The theme was suggested to Carnival director Paulo Barros by a teenage boy on social networking website Orkut, and explored mysteries that have intrigued people through history.

The parade started with a bang. The Comissão de Frente, or Abre-Alas – a group of no more than 15 people who open the parade with choreographies that sum up each samba school’s theme – developed a series of moves based on illusionism (watch a video on G1).

This year’s parade entirely engaging and enjoyable. The crowd at the Sambódromo participated with elation, and joyously watched the spectacle. The meticulously rehearsed choreography of the abre-alas (opening section) deserved all the praise it received. On Tuesday, the school was awarded the Gold Banner (Estandarte de Ouro), an indication that the samba school had a good chance to be the champion.

Advertisements

Carnival Parade: A Cautionary Tale and A Word of Advice

January 29, 2010

Carnival in Rio de Janerio is the event to which every other carnival is compared. The parade is among one of the most incredible spectacles in the world. You will dance the night away with the samba, the lights and the sounds of carnival. In order to fully enjoy all the wonders of the carnival parade, it’s important to think through what kind of parade experience you want. For the parade, there are two types of seats:

Grand stand seats (bleachers) offer open seating. You can get as high and you want and sit wherever you want.

Allocated/numbered seats All seats in sector 9 (the tourist sector) are also numbered and reserved. The reserved seats are either in boxes or you can plant yourself on the concrete, so be sure to bring blankets and seats to make yourself comfortable.

There are pros and cons to both options, but let the following “harrowing tail” help shape your decision:

Back in the days where Rent in Rio’s President Danny Babush first began to frequent Carnival, he opted to watch the parade from sector 3. He took a seat next to a delicate French woman who resembled Audrey Hepburn, and struck up a conversation with the girl and her husband, explaining the history of the parade. Next to the girl was approximately 21 centimeters of seating space, hardly enough for a single butt cheek of an average sized person. In the midst of jovial conversation, cushioned by the comfort of just enough space for belly laughs, a woman towering at over 1.8 meters tall, donning a green derby, a star on her cheek, and with a rear-end easily a meter wide, began to make her way towards Danny and his new friends. Throwing her an uneasy sideways glance, Danny wrongfully assumed that she was merely trying to pass them to reach the isle. Positioning herself in front of the wispy French girl and the sliver of space beside her, the woman began not-so-discreetly wedging herself into the “seat.” The green derby shaking on her head and a grin from ear to ear, the woman did not cease until the whole of her was seated and the French girl was smushed, shoulders crossed, like a one slice ham sandwich.

The moral of the story: If you can’t take the heat, reserve a seat in the tourist section. The only disadvantage of viewing the parade from sector 9 is you miss out on close contact with cariocas—but in such a crowd, there is such a thing as too much contact.

-Jennifer Bunin

Rio Carnival Parade Prices

December 4, 2009

Planning on taking your dream vacation to Rio de Janeiro for Carnival? Are you wondering how much it’s going to cost you to attend the Carnival Parade? On Tuesday, December 1, LIESA, the Independent Samba School League, accepted reservations for Carnival 2010 runway boxes, ranging from about US$1000 to US$3,800 for a box with six seats.

LIESA samba schools form the Special Group. Ticket reservation requests for mezzanine boxes and runway boxes must be submitted by fax. On Dec.18, runway box hopefuls who were selected first-come, first-serve will be notified and will then make their payment at a spot designated by LIESA.

If you’re got a travel agent taking care of your Rio Carnival 2010 tickets, a partner agency in Rio possibly took care of reservations for you today. If you’re curious as to how much LIESA tickets cost when bought straight from the source, go to the LIESA website and click on “Ingressos” on the menu to the left. All ticket prices have been posted now: mezzanine boxes (camarotes, runway boxes (frisas), individual seats (cadeiras) and bleachers (arquibancadas).

The next reservation dates, to be announced, will be for individual seats and bleachers; reservations will be submitted by phone. According to LIESA, those dates will be in the first half of January.

For Carnival accommodations, visit RentInRio.com.